Nutrition And You Do You Know What You Need?

Staying healthy is a serious concern for everyone, not just senior citizens. The amount of information on the subject is daunting. The list of concerns covers practically everything you do. For example:

  • What do you eat?
  • Do you exercise?
  • Do you get enough sleep?
  • Is there too much stress in your life?
  • Do you socialize?
  • Do you smoke? Drink Alcohol, coffee, sweetened drinks?
  • How many fruits and vegetables do you eat?
  • Do you eat red meat? Foods containing hormones, nitrites, or excessive salt?

Just the worry alone is bad for your health. Where do you go for factual information, not hype or advertising? The gradual changeover in grocery stores is a good example of giving people choices about what they consume. Categories of produce and meat and fish products abound, such as organic foods, whole foods, farmer’s markets, hormone-free, gluten-free, low salt, no sugar, no artificial color – the list goes on.

I love to shop at a farmer’s market or fresh foods store. The price is certainly right and I trust that it’s nutritious. By that, I mean that it still retains the vitamins and minerals and has no extra additives. And I drink a lot of water.

I also take a multivitamin every day. Have for years. I’m healthy. As I’ve said, I eat well, but I consider my vitamin pill as essential as brushing my teeth. Some people take oodles of supplements, and others take none. Both may be equally healthy or not. I take it because it’s extra insurance. Once in a while, I eat junk. And staying healthy is a priority. Wellness is 100% better than illness, so I pop my pill and start my day.

Whether to take supplementary nutrition is a very personal choice, based on your values and preferences. Eating good food is, by far, the best choice of all. I say this because the cost of groceries – like everything else – goes up. Getting the most bang for the buck means meeting your daily nutritional needs. Here are a few resources to check out.

https://www.ncoa.org/economic-security/benefits/food-and-nutrition/senior-nutrition/

https://www.nutrition.gov/subject/life-stages/seniors

https://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/features/nutrition-for-seniors#1

http://www.ascseniorcare.com/nutrition-for-seniors/

Talking to your doctor may give you nutritional guidelines for your age, activity level, weight and overall health picture. You can surf around the internet and come up with websites in addition to the ones I have linked here. There are hundreds of recipe websites that encourage good eating.

I hope this post has given you ideas that you can use. I would love for you to share any “good eating” ideas or stories you have. Please use the comments box to connect.

 

Solutions to Health Issues Good Habits

As we age, health issues for men and women are similar. Cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, and arthritis to name a few. As a matter of fact, heart disease now affects as many women as men. Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death for women around the globe. At the same time, reproductive health for American women is lower than that of nearly every other high-income country. Two to three women die of pregnancy complications every day in America. Being mindful of wellness measures is the best solution to maintaining good health.

Maintaining Health Habits

In a previous blog post, Women’s Health: The Cost of Wellness, I mention that the best solution to maintaining good health is to follow a few personal habits. That, along with regular appointments with your doctor, will allow you to feel and be well. There’s a consensus on those habits that are necessary for wellness and a long life.

The Women and Health Initiative of the Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health has offered this suggestion for a healthy and long life. Studies reveal that it’s wise to follow these five habits.

  1. Eat a healthy diet.
  2. Exercise regularly.
  3. Maintain a healthy body weight.
  4. Limit alcohol consumption.
  5. Do not smoke.

The Harvard Healthy Eating Plate is an excellent resource to remind us of what healthy eating is really all about. I cannot include a link without getting written permission. However, it is easily found using Google, and I recommend it highly. After decades of unhealthy eating – too much salt, sugar, red meat, desserts and saturated fats – our society is returning to common sense good – and good for you – food. You really are what you eat.

Relevant Questions

  1. What do I actually eat? Your favorites go on your permanent shopping list. You don’t have to force-feed foods you hate.
  2. How much am I spending for groceries? Do you shop once a week? Every few days? Run to the store because “there’s nothing to eat”? Meaning nothing I like?
  3. Do I look and feel well? Item # 3 above fits right into this pattern. Maintaining a healthy weight is difficult. If you don’t like the way you look or feel, make some changes.

The best diet is the one that keeps you well. I don’t count calories or beat myself up if I have a gooey dessert once in a while. But I strive for balance. I eat more for breakfast and lunch, then keep dinner simple.

Where you take meals is also important. Eating at home, eating out, cooking for yourself or for others weighs in and usually changes what’s on your dinner plate and how much. Writing down what you eat is recommended by many. I don’t keep a food journal, but I give some thought to these facts.

Supplements have been a huge topic for decades, and it has pros and cons. I take a daily vitamin. Even though I eat well, sometimes I skip a meal, don’t feel well, or know my fuel is running low. My Reviews and Recommendations page has information about the vitamin I take. If you’re curious, take a look. The most important fact here is that you should get almost all of your nutrition from food.

I’m always open to ideas, questions,comments or stories from readers. Nutrition is a worthy topic for an open diaogue. Would love to hear from you.

Judy